What is the dark web? 

You may hear someone talk about it on the Investigation Discovery channel, but it seems like an abstract idea rather than a real thing. It sounds like a mysterious place that is exclusive to a small group of Internet users. However, that is not the case. Getting onto the dark web is way more common than you think. 

According to Police Chief Magazine, “only .2% of the Internet is estimated to be on the surface web; the other 99.8% of Internet data resides on the deep web.” 

Although they sound alike, the terms dark web and deep web are not interchangeable. The deep web holds mostly benign, hidden sites such as databases or private business websites. 

The dark web is a subsection in the deep web. With untraceable search engines and anonymous users, it’s typically used for criminal activities/services. These activities can be anywhere from buying and selling illegal substances, stolen goods, or hacked passwords. 

While it might sound interesting, accessing the dark web is unsafe for all computers and possibly incriminating. Logging into the dark web can put your device at risk for expert hackers, comprising all information found in your storage files or accounts. Furthermore, inserting yourself into the dark web could connect you to criminal offenses since it's crawling with criminal activity daily. 

It's important to be aware of what the deep web and the dark web are to protect your devices and yourself. Cybersecurity is going to be one of the most talked-about topics of the year due to the rise of ransomware and phishing. Opening your computer to unknown criminals on the dark web would be like leaving the door to your home wide open after multiple break-ins in your neighborhood. 

Our advice to you is to not go searching for the dark web and to take protective measures for your devices. This can be done through antivirus software for personal computers or an MSSP. 

For more information, give us a call at 318.487.8200!